Les Reports De Edward Coke L'attorney generall le Roigne, de diuers Resolutions, & Judgements donne avec graund deliberation, per les tresruerendes Judges, & Sages de le ley...

Les Reports De Edward Coke L'attorney generall le Roigne, de diuers Resolutions, & Judgements donne avec graund deliberation, per les tresruerendes Judges, & Sages de le ley...

London: Company of Stationers, 1602, 1609. Hardcover. Sir Edward Coke (1552 – 1634) was an English barrister, judge, and politician who is considered to be the greatest jurist of the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras. Coke is best known in modern times for his Institutes, described by John Rutledge as "almost the foundations of our law," and his Reports, which have been called "perhaps the single most influential series of named reports". His Law Reports, known as Coke's Reports, were an archive of judgements from cases he had participated in, watched or heard of. They started with notes he made as a law student in the winter of 1572, with full reporting of cases from October 1579. The Reports were initially written down in seven notebooks, four of which are lost; the first notebook contains not only law reports, but also a draft version of Coke's first Institutes of the Lawes of England. Coke began reporting cases in the traditional manner, by copying out and repeating cases found in earlier law reports, such as those of Edmund Plowden. After being called to the Bar in 1578 he began attending court cases at Westminster Hall, and soon drew the attention of court officials. The original reports were kept in a generally chronological order, interspersed with personal memos, obituaries and notes on court practices. Although loaned to friends and family, and therefore in slight public circulation, Coke's Reports were never formally used during his lifetime. Select cases were published in 1600, containing the most famous of his decisions and pleadings, while a second volume in 1602 was more chronological. The third part, published in the same year, was also chronological, while the fourth, published in 1604, was arranged by subject. The fifth part, published in 1605, is arranged similarly, as is the sixth, published in 1607. Five more volumes were published until 1615, but Coke died before he could publish a single bound copy. [Wikipedia]. This volume has the 1609 Reports bound in first, in two parts, followed by the Third Reports dated 1602. The boards, which appear to be in contemporary leather are detached and the leather is missing from the bottom of the spine. Free front endpapers are detached and one of the rear endpapers is torn in half. There is browning, staining and chipping to the text pages generally confined to the margins. The text is clear and legible with occasional handwritten margin notes.178, 94, 92 pages. LAW/012519. Good.

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